‘Swiss Army Knife’ travel jacket raises $9.19M instead of $20G

‘Swiss Army Knife’ travel jacket raises $9.19M instead of $20G

Published September 04, 2015 FoxNews.com Facebook268 Twitter225 livefyre0 Email Print This multi-functional jacket has 15 coveted features for people on the go. (BauBax) In July, we told you about a jacket that’s getting a lot of buzz in the travel world. Dubbed the “Swiss Army Knife” jacket, it was created by Hiral Sanghavi, a 29-year-old Kellogg School of Management MBA student. The jacket’s 15 features include things like a built-in inflatable neck pillow, eye mask and a special phone-charger pocket. Sanghavi said that he started a Kickstarer campaign with the goal of raising $20,000. This week, the funding period ended and he’s reaped a lot more than that–$9.19 million to be exact, making the jacket the site’s most funded clothing project to date. He told CNN that the idea for the jacket came from his wife, who is a designer living on the West Coast. Sanghavi was constantly traveling from Chicago to visit her and needed a way to keep track of all his gear. “It’s a long flight and I’d forget to take my neck pillow and buy a new one at the airport,” he told CNN. Sanghavi has now put his MBA on hold to concentrate on his San Francisco–based company Baubax that will soon start selling four different styles of the jacket. Nearly 45,000 backers have ordered 70,000 jackets priced between $89 and $120 that Sanghavi plans to ship in November. Interested?  Here’s what it’s got: – Neck pillow — Eye mask — Earphone holders — Drink pocket — Phone pocket — Zipper pocket with telescoping pen/stylus — Microfiber cloth — Passport pocket — Sunglasses pocket — Blanket...

What you need to know about the Heartbleed bug

Published April 10, 2014 FoxNews.com Facebook158 Twitter53 Gplus0 Millions of passwords, credit card numbers and other personal information may be at risk as a result of a major breakdown in Internet security revealed earlier this week, called the “Heartbleed” bug. The damage caused by the bug is currently unknown. But the security hole exists on a vast number of the Internet’s Web servers and went undetected for more than two years. While it’s conceivable that the flaw was never discovered by hackers, it’s nearly impossible to tell. There isn’t much that people can do to protect themselves until the affected websites implement a fix. Here are answers to some common questions about Heartbleed and how you can protect yourself: Q: What is Heartbleed and why is it a big deal? A: Heartbleed affects the encryption technology designed to protect online accounts for email, instant messaging and e-commerce. It was discovered by a team of researchers from the Finnish security firm Codenomicon, along with a Google Inc. researcher who was working separately. It’s unclear whether any information has been stolen as a result of Heartbleed, but security experts are particularly worried about the bug because it went undetected for more than two years. Q: How does it work? A: Heartbleed creates an opening in SSL/TLS, an encryption technology marked by the small, closed padlock and “https:” on Web browsers to show that traffic is secure. The flaw makes it possible to snoop on Internet traffic even if the padlock is closed. Interlopers can also grab the keys for deciphering encrypted data without the website owners knowing the theft occurred. The problem affects...