‘Swiss Army Knife’ travel jacket raises $9.19M instead of $20G

‘Swiss Army Knife’ travel jacket raises $9.19M instead of $20G

Published September 04, 2015 FoxNews.com Facebook268 Twitter225 livefyre0 Email Print This multi-functional jacket has 15 coveted features for people on the go. (BauBax) In July, we told you about a jacket that’s getting a lot of buzz in the travel world. Dubbed the “Swiss Army Knife” jacket, it was created by Hiral Sanghavi, a 29-year-old Kellogg School of Management MBA student. The jacket’s 15 features include things like a built-in inflatable neck pillow, eye mask and a special phone-charger pocket. Sanghavi said that he started a Kickstarer campaign with the goal of raising $20,000. This week, the funding period ended and he’s reaped a lot more than that–$9.19 million to be exact, making the jacket the site’s most funded clothing project to date. He told CNN that the idea for the jacket came from his wife, who is a designer living on the West Coast. Sanghavi was constantly traveling from Chicago to visit her and needed a way to keep track of all his gear. “It’s a long flight and I’d forget to take my neck pillow and buy a new one at the airport,” he told CNN. Sanghavi has now put his MBA on hold to concentrate on his San Francisco–based company Baubax that will soon start selling four different styles of the jacket. Nearly 45,000 backers have ordered 70,000 jackets priced between $89 and $120 that Sanghavi plans to ship in November. Interested?  Here’s what it’s got: – Neck pillow — Eye mask — Earphone holders — Drink pocket — Phone pocket — Zipper pocket with telescoping pen/stylus — Microfiber cloth — Passport pocket — Sunglasses pocket — Blanket...
Mississippi Telehealth Association (MTHA) conference December 2

Mississippi Telehealth Association (MTHA) conference December 2

Join FCC Commissioner Mignon Clyburn, Chairman Bill Ray, and Executive Director Kristi Henderson on December 2 at the Jackson Convention Complex for the first Mississippi Telehealth Association (MTHA) conference. Presentations will be made on the FCC’s healthcare initiatives, integration of telehealth into the Mississippi health system, telecommunications infrastructure availability for telehealth, and future technologies in telehealth. Registration begins at 1:30 p.m., and the conference concludes at 5 p.m. Registration is available at http://conta.cc/1uri73X. Please contact Elizabeth Joseph at ejoseph@mbcc.ms or 601-985-4633 with any questions.  ...
Mississippi Broadband Connect Coalition (MBCC) State Broadband Summit on December 2

Mississippi Broadband Connect Coalition (MBCC) State Broadband Summit on December 2

Join Governor Phil Bryant, FCC Commissioner Mignon Clyburn, and Chairman Jim Barksdale on December 2 at the Jackson Convention Complex for the final State Broadband Summit hosted by the Mississippi Broadband Connect Coalition (MBCC). Registration begins at 8 a.m., and the Summit concludes with lunchtime keynote speaker, Scott Woods, from the Department of Commerce’s National Telecommunications and Information Administration (NTIA). Immediately following the MBCC conference, the U.S. Distance Learning Association will host an interest meeting at 1:30 p.m. in the Convention Complex about the possibility of forming a Mississippi chapter. Registration is available at http://conta.cc/1xZyCRL. Please contact Elizabeth Joseph at ejoseph@mbcc.ms or 601-985-4633 with any...

Google Analytics adds more e-commerce data and reporting tools

 BY ALLISON ENRIGHT Editor The new Enhanced Ecommerce reporting tool lets e-retailers see more metrics about shopping behavior and conversion. “Merchants will be able to understand how far along users get in the buying process and where they are dropping off,” Google says. Google Inc. is making it easier for e-retailers to collect more granular data about how consumers behave on their sites and to generate reports about that behavior. The company announced Wednesday Enhanced Ecommerce, a Google Analytics reporting tool designed specifically for e-retailers. Using the tool, e-retailers can run reports that measure how many visitors view individual products, add or remove them from their shopping cart and abandon or complete transactions. It can also show conversion rates by product and average order value as well as track refund activity. E-retailers can also run Enhanced Ecommerce reports by brand or product category, or create custom reporting, Google says. Enhanced Ecommerce is part of the free version of Google Analytics. It is currently in beta, or test, mode and will roll out in phases over the coming weeks and months, Google says. “Merchants will be able to understand how far along users get in the buying process and where they are dropping off,” according to a Google Analytics blog post. Google announced Enhanced Ecommerce, along with added features allowing users to import their own data and export customized tables with raw data, at the Google Analytics Summit 2014. Google says a free online training course will soon be available through Google’s Analytics Academy for e-retailers who want to learn how to run the new reports and analyze the data. RELATED ARTICLES WEB...

Facebook, Google users threatened by new security flaw

By Jill Scharr Published May 05, 2014 Facebook1054 Twitter354 Gplus56 A serious flaw in two widely used security standards could give anyone access to your account information at Google, Microsoft, Facebook, Twitter and many other online services. The flaw, dubbed “Covert Redirect” by its discoverer, exists in two open-source session-authorization protocols, OAuth 2.0 and OpenID. Both standards are employed across the Internet to let users log into websites using their credentials from other sites, such as by logging into a Web forum using a Facebook or Twitter username and password instead of creating a new account just for that forum. MORE: 7 Scariest Security Threats Headed Your Way Attackers could exploit the flaw to disguise and launch phishing attempts from legitimate websites, said the flaw’s finder, Ph.D. student Wang Jing of the Nanyang Technological University in Singapore. Wang believes it’s unlikely that this flaw will be patched any time soon. He says neither the authentication companies (those with which users have an account, such as Google, Microsoft, Facebook, Twitter or LinkedIn, among others) nor the client companies (sites or apps whose users log in via an account from an authentication company) are taking responsibility for fixing the issue. “The vulnerability is usually due to the existing weakness in the third-party websites,” Wang writes on his own blog. “However, they have little incentive to fix the problem.” The biggest danger of Covert Redirect is that it could be used to conduct phishing attacks, in which cybercriminals seize login credentials, by using email messages containing links to malicious websites disguised as something their targets might want to visit. Normal phishing attempts can be easy to spot,...

What you need to know about the Heartbleed bug

Published April 10, 2014 FoxNews.com Facebook158 Twitter53 Gplus0 Millions of passwords, credit card numbers and other personal information may be at risk as a result of a major breakdown in Internet security revealed earlier this week, called the “Heartbleed” bug. The damage caused by the bug is currently unknown. But the security hole exists on a vast number of the Internet’s Web servers and went undetected for more than two years. While it’s conceivable that the flaw was never discovered by hackers, it’s nearly impossible to tell. There isn’t much that people can do to protect themselves until the affected websites implement a fix. Here are answers to some common questions about Heartbleed and how you can protect yourself: Q: What is Heartbleed and why is it a big deal? A: Heartbleed affects the encryption technology designed to protect online accounts for email, instant messaging and e-commerce. It was discovered by a team of researchers from the Finnish security firm Codenomicon, along with a Google Inc. researcher who was working separately. It’s unclear whether any information has been stolen as a result of Heartbleed, but security experts are particularly worried about the bug because it went undetected for more than two years. Q: How does it work? A: Heartbleed creates an opening in SSL/TLS, an encryption technology marked by the small, closed padlock and “https:” on Web browsers to show that traffic is secure. The flaw makes it possible to snoop on Internet traffic even if the padlock is closed. Interlopers can also grab the keys for deciphering encrypted data without the website owners knowing the theft occurred. The problem affects...